Wednesday, November 28, 2018

SCC BEST ABOB AREA AWARD FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER 2018 FOR PENGERANG BY TOYO ENGINEERING & PETRONAS.



RM Leopad Pengerang receiving SCC Best ABOB Area Award  by Toyo Engineering and Petronas on 15th November 2018 for the month of October 2018.




BINTULU BRANCH - ORGANISED CSR PROGRAM FOR SEKOLAH KEBANGSAAN SEBAUH, SARAWAK.


Bintulu branch conducted CSR program for the school students of Sekolah Kebangsaan Sebauh, Sarawak on 23rd November 2018 by conducting some activities such as lucky draws.





HSSE PERFORMANCE RECOGNITION 2018

AWARDED TO

RM LEOPAD PASIR GUDANG



Tuesday, October 30, 2018



LET THE LIGHT IN OUR HEART GUIDE OUR JUDGEMENT

JOY AND HAPPINESS IN THE AIR...
                IT'S DIWALI EVERYWHERE...
                            LET'S SHOW SOME LOVE AND CARE...
                                      AND WISH EVERYONE OUT THERE...
                                                  

    HAPPY DIWALI

   FROM LEOPAD GROUP


Industry 4.0



Industry 4.0 is a name given to the current trend of automation and data exchange in manufacturing technologies. It includes cyber-physical systems, the Internet of things, cloud computing and cognitive computing. Industry 4.0 is commonly referred to as the fourth industrial revolution.
Industry 4.0 fosters what has been called a "smart factory". Within modular structured smart factories, cyber-physical systems monitor physical processes, create a virtual copy of the physical world and make decentralized decisions. Over the Internet of Things, cyber-physical systems communicate and cooperate with each other and with humans in real-time both internally and across organizational services offered and used by participants of the value chain.

Name

The term "Industry 4.0", sometimes shortened to I4.0 or simply I4, originates from a project in the high-tech strategy of the German government, which promotes the computerization of manufacturing.[6]
The term "Industry 4.0" was revived in 2011 at the Hangover Fair. In October 2012 the Working Group on Industry 4.0 presented a set of Industry 4.0 implementation recommendations to the German federal government. The Industry 4.0 work group members are recognized as the founding fathers and driving force behind Industry 4.0.
On 8 April 2013 at the Hangover Fair, the final report of the Working Group Industry 4.0 was presented.[8]. This working group was headed by Siegfried Dais (Robert Bosch GmbH) and Henning Kagermann (German Academy of Science and Engineering).
As Industry 4.0 principles have been applied by companies they have sometimes been re-branded, for example the aerospace parts manufacturer Meggitt PLC has branded its own Industry 4.0 research project M4.


Design principles

There are four design principles in Industry 4.0. These principles support companies in identifying and implementing Industry 4.0 scenarios.
  • Interconnection: The ability of machines, devices, sensors, and people to connect and communicate with each other via the Internet of Things (IT) or the Internet of People 
  • Information transparency: The transparency afforded by Industry 4.0 technology provides operators with vast amounts of useful information needed to make appropriate decisions. Inter-connectivity allows operators to collect immense amounts of data and information from all points in the manufacturing process, thus aiding functionality and identifying key areas that can benefit from innovation and improvement.[11]
  • Technical assistance: First, the ability of assistance systems to support humans by aggregating and visualizing information comprehensively for making informed decisions and solving urgent problems on short notice. Second, the ability of cyber physical systems to physically support humans by conducting a range of tasks that are unpleasant, too exhausting, or unsafe for their human co-workers.
  • Decentralized decisions: The ability of cyber physical systems to make decisions on their own and to perform their tasks as autonomously as possible. Only in the case of exceptions, interference's, or conflicting goals, are tasks delegated to a higher level.

Meaning

Current usage of the term has been criticized as essentially meaningless, in particular on the grounds that technological innovation is continuous and the concept of a "revolution" in technology innovation is based on a lack of knowledge of the details.
The characteristics given for the German government's Industry 4.0 strategy are: the strong customization of products under the conditions of highly flexible (mass-) production. The required automation technology is improved by the introduction of methods of self-optimization, self-configuration, self-diagnosis, cognition and intelligent support of workers in their increasingly complex work The largest project in Industry 4.0 as of July 2013 is the BMBF leading-edge cluster "Intelligent Technical Systems Ostwestfalen-Lippe (it's OWL)". Another major project is the BMBF project RES-COM,[15] as well as the Cluster of Excellence "Integrative Production Technology for High-Wage Countries" In 2015, the European Commission started the international Horizon 2020 research project CREMA] (Providing Cloud-based Rapid Elastic Manufacturing based on the XaaS and Cloud model) as a major initiative to foster the Industry 4.0 topic.

Effects

In June 2013, consultancy firm McKinsey released an interview featuring an expert discussion between executives at Robert Bosch - Siegfried Dais (Partner of the Robert Bosch Industrietreuhand KG) and Heinz Derenbach (CEO of Bosch Software Innovations GmbH) - and McKinsey experts. This interview addressed the prevalence of the Internet of Things in manufacturing and the consequent technology-driven changes which promise to trigger a new industrial revolution. At Bosch, and generally in Germany, this phenomenon is referred to as Industry 4.0. The basic principle of Industry 4.0 is that by connecting machines, work pieces and systems, businesses are creating intelligent networks along the entire value chain that can control each other autonomously.
Some examples for Industry 4.0 are machines which can predict failures and trigger maintenance processes autonomously or self-organized logistics which react to unexpected changes in production.
According to Dais, "it is highly likely that the world of production will become more and more networked until everything is interlinked with everything else". While this sounds like a fair assumption and the driving force behind the Internet of Things, it also means that the complexity of production and supplier networks will grow enormously. Networks and processes have so far been limited to one factory. But in an Industry 4.0 scenario, these boundaries of individual factories will most likely no longer exist. Instead, they will be lifted in order to interconnect multiple factories or even geographical regions.
There are differences between a typical traditional factory and an Industry 4.0 factory. In the current industry environment, providing high-end quality service or product with the least cost is the key to success and industrial factories are trying to achieve as much performance as possible to increase their profit as well as their reputation. In this way, various data sources are available to provide worthwhile information about different aspects of the factory. In this stage, the utilization of data for understanding current operating conditions and detecting faults and failures is an important topic to research. e.g. in production, there are various commercial tools available to provide overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) information to factory management in order to highlight the root causes of problems and possible faults in the system. In contrast, in an Industry 4.0 factory, in addition to condition monitoring and fault diagnosis, components and systems are able to gain self-awareness and self-productiveness, which will provide management with more insight on the status of the factory. Furthermore, peer-to-peer comparison and fusion of health information from various components provides a precise health prediction in component and system levels and force factory management to trigger required maintenance at the best possible time to reach just-in-time maintenance and gain near-zero downtime.[19]
During EDP Open Innovation conducted in Oct 2018 at Lisbon, Portugal, Industry 4.0 conceptualization was extended by Sens-fix B.V. a Dutch company with introduction of M2S terminology. It essentially is characterizing upcoming service industry to cater to millions of machines, managed by the machines themselves, fortunately using Artificial intelligence developed by humans!.


Challenges

Challenges in implementation of Industry 4.0:
  • IT security issues, which are greatly aggravated by the inherent need to open up those previously closed production shops
  • Reliability and stability needed for critical machine-to-machine communication (M2M), including very short and stable latency times
  • Need to maintain the integrity of production processes
  • Need to avoid any IT snags, as those would cause expensive production outages
  • Need to protect industrial know how (contained also in the control files for the industrial automation gear)
  • Lack of adequate skill-sets to expedite the march towards fourth industrial revolution
  • Threat of redundancy of the corporate IT department
  • General reluctance to change by stakeholders
  • Loss of many jobs to automatic processes and IT-controlled processes, especially for lower educated parts of society
  • Low top management commitment
  • Unclear legal issues and data security
  • Unclear economic benefits/ Excessive investment
  • Lack of regulation, standard and forms of certifications
  • Insufficient qualification of employees

Role of big data and analytics

Modern information and communication technologies like cyber-physical systembig data analytics and cloud computing, will help early detection of defects and production failures, thus enabling their prevention and increasing productivity, quality, and agility benefits that have significant competitive value.
Big data analytics consists of 6 Cs in the integrated Industry 4.0 and cyber physical systems environment. The 6C system comprises:
  1. Connection (sensor and networks)
  2. Cloud (computing and data on demand)
  3. Cyber (model & memory)
  4. Content/context (meaning and correlation)
  5. Community (sharing & collaboration)
  6. Customization (professionalization and value)
In this scenario and in order to provide useful insight to the factory management, data has to be processed with advanced tools (analytics and algorithms) to generate meaningful information. Considering the presence of visible and invisible issues in an industrial factory, the information generation algorithm has to be capable of detecting and addressing invisible issues such as machine degradation, component wear, etc. in the factory floor.

Impact of Industry 4.0

Proponents of the term claim Industry 4.0 will affect many areas, most notably:
  1. Services and business models
  2. Reliability and continuous productivity
  3. IT security: Companies like SymantecCisco, and Penna Security have already begun to address the issue of  security
  4. Machine safety
  5. Manufacturing Sales: Companies like Logic-bay Corporation have released multiple resources addressing Industry 4.0 in the manufacturing sales channel.
  6. Product life cycles
  7. Industry value chain
  8. Workers' education and skills
  9. Socio-economic factors
  10. Industry Demonstration: To help industry understand the impact of Industry 4.0, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, signed a proclamation to state "Cincinnati to be Industry 4.0 Demonstration City".
  11. An article published in February 2016 suggests that Industry 4.0 may have a beneficial effects for emerging economies such as India.[24]
The aerospace industry has sometimes been characterized as "too low volume for extensive automation" however Industry 4.0 principles have been investigated by several aerospace companies, technologies have been developed to improve productivity where the upfront cost of automation cannot be justified, one example of this is the aerospace parts manufacturer Meggitt PLC's project, M4. The discussion of how the shift to Industry 4.0, especially digitization, will affect the labor market is being discussed in Germany under the topic of Work 4.0.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industry_4.0

LEOPAD CHALLENGE TROPHY 2018

      DATE    : 24TH NOVEMBER 2018
           TIME     : 7.30 A.M - 6.00 P.M
           VENUE  : LAVANA SPORTS, JALAN GENTING KELANG,TAMAN DANAU KOTA,
                         51300, KUALA LUMPUR.



EXCITING CASH PRIZES
i)WINNER OF THE CATEGORY
  (men's doubles & women's doubles)
   GOLD MEDAL / HEAD
   CASH PRIZE RM2000 / PAIR
   HAMPER / PAIR
ii)1st RUNNER UP OF THE CATEGORY
    (men's doubles & women's doubles)
    SILVER MEDAL / HEAD
    CASH PRIZE RM1000 / PAIR
    HAMPER / PAIR
iii) 2nd RUNNER UP OF THE CATEGORY
     (men's doubles & womens doubles)
     BRONZE MEDAL / HEAD
     CASH PRIZE RM500 / PAIR
     HAMPER / PAIR



IV) OVERALL CHAMPIONSHIP WINNER
   (winning team will be awarded based on point system)
 CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY
                                                               

V) LUCKY DRAW PRIZES FOR 15 INDIVIDUALS
 (open to participants and volunteers ONLY)
  GRAND PRIZE
   SECOND PRIZE
   THIRD PRIZE
     4th - 15th PRIZE







      

Thursday, August 30, 2018

MSOSH 2017 OSH AWARD


  Venue              : Berjaya Times Square Hotel, Kuala Lumpur                                              
Date                 : 9th August 2018                                                                                         Officiated by    : Dato' Mahfuz Bin Omar (Deputy Prime Minister of Human Resources)                Award              : GOLD CLASS 1 (RM LEOPAD MALACCA BRANCH)





LEOPAD GROUP VISION 2023 (LG2023)

5 Years business plan
The plan will be execute from 2019 until 2023
Town Hall session to be announced soon 


NORTHERN REGION NIOSH APPRECIATION AWARD 2018



             Venue : Hotel Iconic, Pulau Pinang.
Date : 15th August 2018 
                                                Award : Northern Region NIOSH Appreciation Award             (Kulim Branch)



LEOPAD HIRE 2018 ANNUAL EMPLOYEE FORUM


Venue: Illham Resort, Port Dickson
Date : 10th - 12th August 2018



GEBENG SAFETY DAY

Venue : RM Leopad Gebeng Branch
Date : 28 July 2018




Friday, August 17, 2018


LEOPAD GROUP MERDEKA PHOTO CONTEST 2018


We invite all the Leopad Group staffs to share their photos, showing their patriotism towards Malaysia. Photos can be of people, arts and culture, landscape and architecture, job site,  tool box meeting or even favorite Malaysian food or drink consist of symbol of patriotism as well as related to Leopad Group is Mandatory
All staffs are encouraged to participate. 

Contest Date 
                                     Photo Submission  : 9th - 18th August 2018 (11:59pm)
Winner's Announcement  : 20th August 2018


      Prizes
  • 1st place 
  •  RM500 cash and photo will featured in Leopad Group 2019 Calendar with the winner's name.
  • 2nd place
  • RM250.00 cash
  • 3rd place
  • RM100.00 cash



Thursday, July 26, 2018

CELEBRATING HARI RAYA PORT LUCK LUNCH AT HQ, WISMA LEOPAD


















Are the scaffold boards you’re using in a safe condition?

The Health and Safety Authority is concerned with an increased detection rate of sub-standard scaffold boards in use on construction sites and in an increase in the number of accidents involving sub-standard boards.
As per the Code of Practice for Access and Working Scaffolds all boards should comply with the BS 2482 standard (standard updated in 2009).
Boards manufactured to the standard can be identified by a marking on their end bands. BS2482 requires that the end bands are marked with the following:
• Number and year of British Standard;
• Identification mark of the supplier;
• The letter M or V (mechanically or visually graded);
• The word “support”, followed by the target span in metres up to which the board may be supported;
• Where appropriate, the identification mark of a third-party certification body.

The end bands also have an important role in protecting the vulnerable end grain of the boards. They should extend around the edges of the board by at least 150mm for 38mm boards and at least 100mm for 63mm boards. The bands should be secured with three clout nails into the end of the board and two on each edge. BS2482 also permits the use of teeth formed in the end band or special long staples to secure the end bands. Damaged end bands can leave sharp edges which can cause cuts when handled.
Any scaffolding equipment, including scaffolding boards, particularly if they have been in storage for a period of time, must not be used unless inspected by a competent person and deemed fit for purpose. It is vital that all scaffold boards are checked regularly thereafter for damage, rot or any other feature which may reduce the strength of the board. It is a legal requirement that all equipment used for working at heights in construction is inspected by a competent person at least every seven days and records of these inspections kept. BS 2482 provides guidance and limits on the acceptability of defects in scaffold boards. Any board which fails one or more of the inspection criteria in BS2482 must be destroyed.
Boards must be cleaned prior to storage and inspection. Check for surface contamination of the board such as chemicals or cement. If you can’t clean it and inspect it properly, then the board should be destroyed.

The following is a non-exhaustive list of some of the common defects occurring in scaffold boards:
Fissures (shakes, checks and splits)
BS2482 sets a limit for fissures on the face of boards of 225mm length, and 12mm or more in depth. Careful attention should be paid to splits in the ends of boards which can be partially hidden by the end bands, but may pass through the full thickness of
the board.

Wane
The standard permits a limited amount of wane (a rounded edge caused by the curvature of the log from which a board has been cut). The limits on wane are 25mm on the face of the board, and 12mm on the edge of the board.

Mechanical damage
If the board is damaged to an extent that will reduce its strength, or is likely to cause unsafe footholding, or an injury whilst handling the board, then it should be destroyed.
In normal use a board’s top face on one job may become its bottom face on the next job. Mechanical damage may occur on the first job but the failure may not happen until the board is turned and loaded in the opposite direction. The user causing the damage may not witness the failure and is unlikely to be aware of the consequences of their actions.
Common examples of unacceptable damage include:
• Broken or damaged end bands;
• Wood broken from the edge of the boards which significantly reduces the cross-section of the board;
• Loose or broken knots;
• Damage caused by being struck by the forks of a forklift truck;
• Excessive cuts in the faces of boards caused by hand saws, circular saws or angle grinders;
• Transverse cracks caused by overloading.


Distortion
As scaffold boards are exposed to all types of weather, the wood is exposed to sunlight as well as cycles of wetting and drying, which can cause boards to distort.
A distorted board is a dangerous board, as it can move in service. The standard sets limits on cup, bow, spring and twist. If any board exceeds these limits it should be destroyed.

Insect attack
If a board contains wormholes or wood wasp holes or if there is an infestation of the timber then the board must be destroyed.

Fungal Decay







    
Boards must be free from any signs of fungal decay or rot. Fungal decay, usually wet rot, is common in poorly stored scaffold boards. Wood is vulnerable to attack when the moisture content is over 20%. It can be detected by discoloration of the wood, which also becomes softer. Rot often starts at cracks or around knots in wood because these areas are wetter as water is retained in the cracks. The boards will also often smell musty. A decayed board loses weight and so will feel lighter than an equivalent sound board. Below shows two examples of decay.






In the early stages of decay there is a minor loss in bending strength or stiffness, but there is considerable loss in resistance to impact loads, for example, a worker jumping onto a board, or lifting a heavy sill etc. In the later stages of decay large holes filled with soft decayed wood appear. The rotted wood has transverse cracks in the wood fibres and the material crumbles easily.

Decay in your boards can be reduced by storing planks properly when not in use. This is particularly relevant in these economic times when large quantities of scaffolding may be stored for longer periods of time.
Boards should be stored preferably under cover and clear of the ground. Spacers must be used between each layer of stacked boards to allow an adequate flow of air
around the boards to dry them out.

http://www.churngold.com/divisions/construction/health-safety-bulletins-and-alerts.html

SAFETY HEALTH & ENVIRONMENTAL                                 DAY 2018


 

We are cordially invited to you to attend the SHE Day to be held in RM LEOPAD, GEBENG BRANCH on July 28th 2018.




Management of Asbestos Containing Materials on Demolition & Refurbishment Sites


The Health & Safety Authority (the Authority) is specifically targeting this alert at all duty-holders involved in the management of demolition or refurbishment works including Clients, Project Supervisors for the Design Process (PSDP), Project Supervisors for the Construction Stage (PSCS), Designers (including architects, engineers etc.) and contractors to ensure Asbestos-Containing Materials (ACMs) are correctly identified before such works take place and are dealt with accordingly.
The Authority has recently engaged with a number of sites where evidence of poor practice or lack of understanding of ACM risk management required formal enforcement action to be taken. This included the issuing of Prohibition Notices that result in the cessation of work and effective site closure. Subject to the subsequent carrying out, by a competent person, of the required Refurbishment and Demolition Asbestos Survey (RDAS), some sites have incurred substantial clean-up costs and significant project delays.
Needless to say, of greatest concern is the serious exposure risk to which employees or others may have been subjected and its potential for the development of asbestos related diseases in years to come such as lung cancer and mesothelioma. All such incidents are investigated and may result in the prosecution of relevant parties including the Client, Designers, the PSDP, the PSCS and Contractors depending on the dutyholder failures and circumstances involved.
In particular the relevant duty holders must ensure:
  • An RDAS is carried out by a competent person well in advance of commencement of site works to comply with the 2006/2010 Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Asbestos Regulations and the Safety Health and Welfare at Work (Construction) Regulations 2013 (the Construction Regulations). This facilitates effective planning of any necessary ‘pre-works’ ACM removals.
  • An RDAS is relevant to all pre-2000 commercial, agricultural and domestic refurbishment and demolition sites.
  • If a construction project presents a risk of disturbance of ACM, a PSDP and PSCS must be appointed in writing. Asbestos is a ‘Particular Risk’ as set out in Schedule 1 of the Construction Regulations.
  • The Preliminary Safety and Health Plan drawn up by the PSDP must address all particular risks including asbestos. This should include the results/findings of any asbestos survey (RDAS).
  • Where the site works are planned so as to avoid disturbance of any ACMs that are to remain in situ, the location of those ACMs must be communicated by the PSCS via the Safety and Health Plan to all contractors on site. This is to ensure that inadvertent disturbance of ACMs during the works is avoided
Leaving ACMs in situ for the duration of a refurbishment contract must be subject to a thorough risk assessment by a competent person.
  • ACMs must be removed prior to demolition or to any refurbishment works which may cause disturbance. Removal must be carried out by competent trained contractors using appropriate safe working practices.
  • All high risk ACMs e.g. laggings, insulating board etc. must be removed by specialist asbestos contractors under strictly controlled conditions and notified to the Authority 14 days in advance of asbestos removal commencing. A four-stage clearance process, including air monitoring, to assess the fitness for reoccupation (or, as appropriate, demolition) must be carried out by an independent, competent, asbestos analyst. A ‘certificate of reoccupation’ or ‘clearance certificate’ is issued by the analyst.
  • Lower risk ACMs can be removed by a competent contractor with appropriate training, risk assessments and detailed method statements. Verification of complete removal, in the form of a certificate or written statement must be drawn up by the competent person who has carried out the necessary post-works checks, visual or otherwise.
  • All asbestos waste must be disposed of in accordance with relevant waste legislation
  • All relevant asbestos documents (asbestos surveys, clearance certification, waste certification etc.) must be filed in the Safety File for post-works handover to client.
The requirements stated above apply equally to all sectors including commercial, agricultural and domestic sites.
Additional Information
Asbestos, a category 1 carcinogen, is a well-known construction and demolition hazard in pre-2000 buildings. The Authority has produced comprehensive guidance on ACM management. This guidance clearly explains the approach to be taken and describes the level of competence required for the various tasks and roles involved.


SCC BEST ABOB AREA AWARD FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER 2018 FOR PENGERANG BY TOYO ENGINEERING & PETRONAS. RM Leopad Pengerang receivin...